ICMM announces initiative to simplify responsible mining standards

The International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM) announced plans to combine responsible mining standards into a single, internationally accepted framework, marking a significant step towards responsibility and transparency in the global mining industry.

responsible mining

The International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM) announced plans to combine responsible mining standards into a single, internationally accepted framework, marking a significant step towards responsibility and transparency in the global mining industry. This programme aims to simplify and streamline the multitude of standards now in use. It was developed in partnership with the Mining Association of Canada, Copper Mark, and the World Gold Council.

President of the ICMM Rohitesh Dhawan emphasised that everyone must do their part to uphold industry standards and emphasised the organization’s dedication to voluntary measures that go above and beyond state laws.

We don’t pretend to be juries, prosecutors, judges, or police all in one, and we shouldn’t. Remember that all of our actions are voluntary and go above and beyond complying with national laws, he stated at a panel discussion at the Cape Town Investing in African Mining Indaba.

The realisation that the mining industry is currently confronted with an excessive amount of voluntary requirements to demonstrate responsible operations served as further evidence of the necessity for consolidation. Dhawan conceded, “There are too many,” citing worries voiced by governments, investors, metal users, and civil society organisations. The ICMM and its partners have committed to streamlining the landscape in response to these concerns.

The partnership entails creating a single international standard for responsible mining by combining the standards of the Mining Association of Canada, the World Gold Council, Copper Mark, and the ICMM. Through a multi-stakeholder governance framework, this ambitious project seeks to establish a uniform assurance procedure that guarantees explicit traceability and, most importantly, independence.

The industry is about to benefit from a single, trustworthy source of information that is consistently applied thanks to the unified standard.

The programme strives for a large-scale global influence rather than just enhancing already ethical businesses. The ICMM, which represents over 25,000 mining businesses globally, understands that for the unified standard to have any real impact, it must be widely adopted.

The question of whether the mining industry faces a significant challenge in promoting reasoned, fact-based conversations in the face of widespread disinformation also took centre stage during the discussion. Nafi Chinery, head of the Natural Resource Governance Institute Africa, asked if the present “post-truth” climate makes it harder to collaborate.

Chinary voiced concerns about the divisiveness of discussions about climate change and the shift in the mining sector, especially in Africa. She emphasised the importance of openness and trust, pointing out the benefits of mining to different nations while addressing worries about the effects on the environment and society.

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